Thursday, September 14, 2017

The Economic Effects of Harvey & Irma

The Economic Effects of Harvey & Irma

The hurricane season has already wrought havoc and harm across the United States. Hurricane Harvey killed about 70 people in the Southwest last week, leaving tens of thousands homeless and spreading toxic chemicals throughout Texas. After devastating the Caribbean, the monstrous Hurricane Irma is expected to bring suffering to residents of southern Florida. Americans across the country are feeling the impact of these natural disasters economically as gas prices skyrocket, agricultural land is destroyed, and unemployment claims spike.
Gasoline prices are soaring toward a two-year high with the Labor Day driving rush approaching after Hurricane Harvey desolated the Texas Gulf Coast. With about 15 oil refineries closed as of Wednesday due to extreme flooding, gasoline prices are continuing to rise with the national average now at $2.43 per gallon (Bomey). In the short-term, panicked Texans are keeping their tanks topped off, this sudden demand further decreasing the gasoline supply. There were multiple reports about long lines in front of 7-Elevens throughout Texas, as drivers waited two to four hours for every pump. One positive externality created from this natural disaster is a website called GasBuddy. The website recently activated an online gas availability tracker throughout Texas, encouraging drivers to report gas stations that are out. In the screenshot of GasBuddy, red indicates all of the gas stations that drivers reported as being out of gasoline. Green indicates gas stations that have gasoline in stock.
Meanwhile, Hurricane Irma threatens to destroy Florida farmlands which may affect U.S. food prices and farmer finances in the months and years ahead. Trailing only California in produce growth, Florida has a significant impact on American grocery stores. The state accounts for about 10% of America’s fresh fruits and vegetables (Bjerga). However, the scarcity created by the storm has pushed prices for oranges and other citrus products higher this week. If the storm continues toward central Florida as forecasted, it could easily rip oranges and grapefruits from their branches, demolishing years of hard work and dedication by thousands of farmers. From an agricultural standpoint, Hurricane Irma marks a huge negative externality, limiting resources across the U.S. in the long-term.
Both Hurricane Harvey and Irma have the power to slow economic growth by one percentage point as measured by GDP. In fact, initial unemployment claims climbed to 298,000 last week after Hurricane Harvey hit the Southwest—the highest reading since April 2015 (Soergel). With a decrease in production and an increase in unemployment, it will be difficult for those affected by the storms to find a place to work. However, outside of the storms, the U.S. labor market remains in solid shape allowing businesses the opportunity to hire more workers. Additionally, the federal program of DUA (Disaster Unemployment Assistance) will help to provide temporary financial assistance to individuals affected by either natural disaster. Altogether, DUA benefits are available to workers in 39 Texas counties, making these natural disasters slightly easier to recover from financially. As seen in the picture, Texas residents who lost their home due to Hurricane Harvey are offered a temporary shelter until they can get back up on their feet.
Up to this point, in the weeks following both Hurricane Harvey and Irma, economists continue to predict an increase in national gas prices, a decrease in production and shipment of agricultural goods, and an even higher unemployment rate as tens of thousands are left without work. As the saying “guns or butter” goes, the U.S. government must choose to invest in rebuilding the agricultural economy thus removing the havoc caused by the two storms.

Works Cited

Bjerga, Alan. "Hurricane Irma Threatens $1.2 Billion of Florida Crops." Bloomberg.com. Bloomberg, 06 Sept. 2017. Web.
Bomey, Nathan. "Hurricane Harvey Pushes Gas Prices near Two-year High." USA Today. Gannett Satellite Information Network, 30 Aug. 2017. Web.
"Disaster Unemployment Assistance: How Workers Can Access the Program After Hurricane Harvey." NELP. National Employment Law Project, 7 Sept. 2017. Web.
Koenig, David. "Tourism, Agriculture Businesses Brace for Irma's Impact." ABC News. ABC News Network, 8 Sept. 2017. Web.
Mosier, Jeff. "How Panicked Drivers Are Making North Texas Gas Shortages Worse." Dallas News. N.p., 01 Sept. 2017. Web.
Shepherd, Todd. "Analysts: Hurricane Harvey Could Slow Economic Growth by Full Percentage Point." Washington Examiner. Washington Examiner, 10 Sept. 2017. Web.
Soergel, Andrew. "Storms Cloud Economic Growth." U.S. News & World Report. U.S. News & World Report, 08 Sept. 2017. Web.

58 comments:

  1. I found that the mention of the app GasBuddy really cool because I use that app whenever I need to get gas because it shows the lowest price in the area but I never really thought that it could be used in the ways it has been for Florida and Texas

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  2. I agree Hurricane Harvey and Irma both costed many people their homes. This is a huge part of the opportunity cost of not living in these locations. it has been known to have hurricanes around Florida but still people stay. Is it worth it? I would say no but it's not my decision. The opportunity cost for most effected by living in Florida is sadly loosing their homes to these hurricanes.

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  3. I can relate very strongly to this as my aunt was apart of hurricane Irma. It is a terrible thing that happened and like you said, the worst one to touch down on american soil. You said it very well about how you didn't only add background information, but you tied the economics in as well and used pictures.

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  4. I like that this blog post has a lot of information and actually breaks things down to the t. The fact that gas prices could stay like this for 2 years is alarming. Also people waiting in line for 2-4 hours for gas is ridiculous . The time it took to write this post is great appreciated because it gives us a good input.

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  6. The positive externality of gas prices skyrocketing was interesting to see that people are using social media to support fleeing the hurricane. I think GasBuddy is a great way for our country to continue growing even in these horrid conditions. However the negative externality of losing farmland is devastating because a lot of Wisconsin’s fruit and produce are from Florida and while this tropical storm is destroying people hardwork and homes, other states are being affected as well. Of course not as much, but it just goes to show how Irma can hurt the entire country even if just landing in one general area. Great writing, I loved learning about our country and the positives and negatives of this storm!

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  7. It’s truly devastating the damage that has been caused from these two massive hurricanes. I don’t think there is one type of person, one state that is not affected by this disaster. I agree with you that the U.S. government needs to step up and invest in rebuilding the agricultural economy, because as you previously stated 10% of our fresh produce comes from the sunny state of Florida. If this doesn’t happen, crops will continuously rise in price as well as become more scarce for the colder months.

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  8. Although Hurricane Irma & Harvey did massive damage and caused a great amount of inconvenience for everyone involved, that doesn't mean it does not have positive effects. Some jobs are created due to the fact things need to be cleaned up and rebuilt. An increase in gas prices means the businesses make more profit, and that profit could be put towards the rebuilding effort. Also, disasters like this is what brings out the best in humanity. It restores people's faith in humanity after they see everybody trying to help each other out.

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  9. I liked how you incorporated some of the facts going along with the hurricanes and not just some of the effects economically. It was good how you incorporated how the gas prices are going to go up and it shows how much we really are in need for gas since it said people waited in line for hours just to fill up their tanks. I also liked how you said the gas price rose to $2.43 per gallon instead of just saying the gas prices rose. Also it was good how you added how Florida gives 10% of the nation's fruits and vegetables and that’s important because the price in those citrus fruits will be going up. I think you did a good job talking about how there are programs people can use to help themselves when being out of there jobs. I liked how you talked about the possible shelters they were offered up and how some people who use the DUA program can help stay financially stable after the hurricane. In the end I think you organized the post really well and I liked how you incorporated some facts and statistics along with the economic hardships they had to overcome.

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  10. I agree with your article. I like how you address each separate hurricane and what went on during each tragedy. It was nice to see the correlation between some events across the US, such as gas prices skyrocketing, the slowing of economic growth in the US and how in the future, the food prices will probably go up, because there won’t be as much production of the goods. The images you included into the post throughout really helped me to understand further information about the events occurring.

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    1. Furthering and relating to Alyssa, this article written about "The Economic Effects of Harvey & Irma" is very accurate and agreeable. It not only shows the correlation between some events across the US and how it relates economically, it also shows the predictions from Economists on what the future may look like and proceed to react like, from the Hurricane. Additionally, the pictures incorporated in the article connected to the text which allowed for a better understanding. Although, there are predictions in the increasing of gas prices that may be beneficial as it'll continue for economic growth. If the prices were to decrease, the demand for gas would increase as many people would need it to be supplied.

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  11. Obviously the hurricanes have led to many disasters not just for families but also businesses. I have noticed an increase in gas prices since Hurricane Harvey and that may because of the location of the ports from Texas bringing in the gas. Of course the gas is in demand when supply is low, which creates for long lines at gas stations which can’t be accounted for. Also a major issue, that you said, that will definitely affect our consumer base is the lack of fresh crops to be sold because of the destruction of farmland. Especially in Florida, where fruit crops are in definite need. Overall, it will take many years to recover from this and I think you did a good job showing this based on your data.

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  12. I didn't really think about the fact that the hurricane can affect more than just people hit by it. When you were talking about how 15 oil refineries are closed which is making the gas prices more expensive for not only locals but people around the US. With all the chaos and natural disasters that happen in Florida do you really think it is worth it to live down there knowing the risks?

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  13. This was interesting to me because I was not aware of all the economic consequences that came along with a hurricane hitting the United States. I was aware of all the damage that it causes and all of the people that it affects but I never thought about how they could impact the country's grocery stores or gas prices. My question is that with all the damage and rebuilding that is involved with a hurricane, does that potentially impact the cost of building materials and things like that. For example when rebuilding the city of Houston. But otherwise great job and your post was very thought provoking.

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  14. I agree that many people were affected by hurricane Irma and Harvey. The process of employment and production was greatly affected due to the lack of employment. Along with that, gas is a rising situation where gas prices are increasing and gas is decreasing.

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  15. I totally agree with your whole statement on how the hurricanes put the people of Florida and Texas in a rocky situation where everything is not going their way that they want it to. Likewise, gas prices increasing because everyone is trying to stock up on their supplies when trying to leave the state before the hurricane hits and everyone losing their jobs as businesses are ruined. What really surprised me was that people actually stayed in line for 2-4 hours just to stock up on gas. However, I liked how you showed the problems between both hurricanes and how it affected them both in the same and different ways. Also, the economic view of how it could affect the whole US as a whole. It really helps to see that you used images so that I could understand where you are going with everything and really using those words from our vocabulary.

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  16. I entirely agree with you that these hurricanes are causing many economic problems. Whether the problem is gas, jobs, or food/farming America is being greatly impacted. You made a great point to show how the people being affected by the hurricanes are coping. When you mentioned the GasBuddy app I thought that was neat because you gave an example of what people are using to get around the storms. I agree with you that the hurricanes will bring great impact on the United States, but what about other countries that will be affected by the disasters?

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  17. I’d agree with you that this is an obvious problem. I thought it was really cool for you to incorporate maps, and the gasbuddy screenshot. That gave me a better idea on how bad it actually was down in Texas.I knew they had gas shortages, but I never really thought about how gas would be so limited do to the storm. I agree with you when you said this is going to have a great economic impact on both Texas and Florida. On the news the other night I heard that this would've been the most costly hurricane in United States history but the Hurricane kinda went into the gulf instead of hitting most of Florida. Overall, I thought this was really well written and got my attention right away.

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  18. I would say that even out of the damage the hurricanes have brought, the U.S. is providing as much service as possible to support those in trouble. The positive externalities of GasBuddy and the employment of those now unemployed truly show that America is taking a stand against the storms.It’s been reported already that 100% of power is out on the vulnerable islands. Those stranded in the Florida Keys and the islands in and around the Caribbean from Irma are also taken to safety on company cruise ships. This is of course temporary until the damage done by harsh winds and flooding are fixed. This proves that the US is very willing to help their people in danger.

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  20. I agree that the effects of both Hurricanes can negatively affect the areas of Texas and Florida. The gas prices are very high due to these hurricanes, and it will only get higher until the refineries open back up again. It can be a concern for people that haven’t been hit by the hurricanes to pay the extra money for gas, but it is a very high demand for the supply the country is given. More famous celebrities, like JJ Watt, should start charitable funds for these natural disasters to help out people in need in Texas and Florida. The unemployment will go down because of this, but there should be even more job opportunities to rebuild and help out those areas that have been destroyed.

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  21. The only good news to come out of these hurricanes are the first responders from across the country and the many donations and fundraisers that have generated a stockpile of money to help rebuild. In one night alone, the “Hand in Hand” telethon raised $44 million. Many of people I assume have heard of JJ Watt’s donation he set up that has recently passed $30 million. While these numbers may not pay for the total of the damages, they most certainly make an impact on many lives and help mend the fallout.

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  22. I agree that the hurricane has made many damages but, the U.S. has done many things to help people get back on their feet. For example the DUA helps people get back on their feet. Also people have donated food and have opened up stores in Texas for people to come and sleep. Their will be agriculture problems but the problems will help the U.S. come together and help each other. Working together will help grow the economy.

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  23. The price of rebuilding the cities devastated by the storms is much more than what they sent to fix the economy completely in an instant. The only way to fix this instability safely is to slowly rebuild block by block by giving the people that lost their jobs government construction jobs to rebuild. This is one of the safest ways to help and protect the economic flux from these disasters. - Connor P.

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  24. I completely agree that the economic effects of the hurricane have been detrimental. Although, I also think that nation's care for the disaster shows through. There have been so many organizations stepping up to help those in need. However, some things just can't be fixed by donations. Jobs and productions of goods and services are taking an economic downfall, which is overall extremely harmful.

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    1. I agree with you completely. I think in times of hardships like this natural disaster it is amazing how communities come together to help those in need, and how many donations and volunteers have stepped up to help. The downside to that is the fact that even though there are so many people wanting to help, sometimes due to the amount of damage caused, the economy struggles to keep up with production of their services, or are in need of more resources that aren't quite available.

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  25. I completely agree that the recent hurricanes have taken a toll on our economy. People in Florida and Texas are frantically looking for resources such as gasoline that they were so used to having prior to this natural disaster. However, it was a smart business decision for the gas stations to increase the price of gas since it is so scarce. Also, the positive externality of the GasBuddy app was a smart invention for the victims of the hurricanes as it makes finding gas much easier and more efficient.

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    1. I agree with this too, I think the GasBuddy app that shows which gas stations are out of gas is helpful to the people searching for gas, since it is so scarce right now due to these storms. I understand that the gas stations want to raise the prices of gas because they know they can make more money off it since people have to buy gas, but it's kind of unfair in way because people don't really have a choice as to whether or not to buy gas.

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  26. Food prices raising is a big deal, because they are already high right now. Like avocados are at a very high price. At pick n save they are almost 2 dollars for 1. That is because of the hurricane in mexico it has reduced their crops: therefore, raising the price of the food, and the scarcity of it. The article states that the gas prices raised to $2.43 which doesn’t seem like a lot to when they were 4 dollars in 2013.(Zach Roelandts)

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  27. The opportunity cost pays a big role in this situation because people that choose to like in these areas are familiar with natural disasters and know the abilities of the storm causing them to leave. Not only does that pay a role but another interesting thing that plays a role is the community/others and this helps many because as stated in the article it shows they have an app to tell many where there is gas so people don't have to trek around the area. Also stated was the financial and residence help this helps the community as a whole because for the people who no longer can go home they are able to stay with others going thru the same gaining financial support.

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  28. This essay illustrates very well the havoc and chaos hurricanes can cause in the southern half of the country. During Hurricane Katrina, gas prices rose exponentially as well, sometimes rising 50 cents a day due to the storm interrupting oil production and people buying as much as they can to escape the storm. Also, although Katrina didn’t affect farmland as much as Irma, the earlier hurricane affected ocean shipping, shutting down some major exports until the fall and incapacitating some major ports in the area for a year.

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    1. I agree that Hurricane Katrina affected the people and the trades that were done by land. It affected the economy a lot. But I think that Hurricane Irma also affected the trades and not just Katrina.

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  29. Both of the Hurricanes have affected the whole nation leaving thousands homeless
    And many more unemployed. Without people working the economic growth will decrease. And with gas price increasing people will be affected on home much they can afford to travel. With hurricane Irma food prices will increase and this will also affect how much others are able to buy. With both food and gas prices increasing, and thousands left unemployed the US economy is going to take a big hit from this and Economic Growth will be greatly affected.

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  30. I agree that the hurricanes will do a tremendous amount of damage to the cities and economy of those affected cities. However, traffic is a very big issue for those that are trying to evaluate. The highways and roads are completely flooded with bumper-to-bumper traffic. This is preventing those trying to evacuate from actually leaving since the roads are all blocked off making them stuck and still getting hit by the hurricane. Roads being blocked off also prevents first responders from getting into the affected areas to help the people in need.

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  31. I agree with your statement that both of these Hurricanes have placed the residents of these states in a tough situation due to the lack of resources. One topic you talked about was unemployment and how the rates have increased to 298,000 people the week after Harvey, and most of those people will have a difficult time finding a place to work. I believe that with all of the damage done, this could be an opportunity to find more jobs for the unemployed. There is a lot necessities that are needed to be rebuilt for the foundation of their community that could be put in the hands of the unemployed and turned into a short term job for people that need them. This way people are being provided with money, while still helping out others in this time of need.

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  32. I think that despite the major devastation we see from the hurricanes, times like these (when a piece of the US is suffering) truly bring out the best of the people. Individuals across the US have been able to give money, food, and necessary items to help out those in Texas and Florida as they begin their rebuilding process. Although the recovery will take a long time to return to normal, no support from the rest of the country would make this process much longer. The hurricanes showcase that although there may be natural disaster, in order to rebuild the economy of the United States while avoiding as many price swings as possible, is truly a team effort. Each individual who has helped support are really those who are most responsible for the return of a productive city such as Houston or the farming communities of Florida. The hurricanes demonstrate that in order to effectively recover from the natural disasters and prevent a downturn in the economy, we must work together and have the sense of unity of for example the United States.

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  34. I really liked everything you said in your writing.This goes to show you that Hurricane Harvey and Irma didn't only effect Florida and Texas.However it effected the whole nation.How when the hurricane hit Texas the gas prices have been sky rocketing up.Or how a lot of the crops from Florida were ruined because of the hurricane.This frees up a lot of job opportunity.While it brought a lot people together.Hurricane Harvey and Irma were obviously tragedies.

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  35. The hurricanes really have effected the economy, even in Pewaukee, over a thousand miles away from both Florida and Texas, we see gas prices rising. I remember getting gas before the hurricane hit for around $2.19, and then the next day it went up to $2.35 and has been continuing to rise. The United States already has pretty unsteady gas prices, and the natural disasters are really taking a toll on them. I agree, there are many negative externalities from the hurricanes, but the people of the United States and the government are doing a good job backing up those who are affected. We can see right at home, in Pewaukee, people coming together and donating goods for the victims. It is also shown on the news, the national guard who say they're in it for the long run, helping those in need. The responders were quickly on the scene, dedicating their time to the aftermath of the storm, so yes the storms really affected the economy and many people's lives, but there are many people who are also helping, and that makes a huge difference for those that the storm directly affected. We are lucky, because the storm indirectly has hit us, only affecting prices, not our family or our homes.

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  36. The unemployment rate increasing because of the hurricanes will definitely setback the goal of full employment. It will also set back the goal of economic growth with the GDP decreasing. The scarcity of oranges and other exports of Florida and Texas will impact economic growth with the supply decreasing dramatically. Along with the gas prices skyrocketing, I would assume that the food and water prices will also dramatically increase as these places will have to import more resources that they had before the devastation of farmland or fields. This could create other positive externalities, much like Gasbuddy, that benefit from the lack of production in Florida. For instance, companies could take advantage of this and economically benefit by providing Florida and Texas with the food, water and other resources that they now lack. Basic necessities may also be higher in demand, which could cause other positive externalities and opportunities for other companies to benefit.

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  37. I think that you are absolutely right that these hurricanes will hurt the U.S economy. In turns of economic growth that could be crippling with the first quarter of the year economic growth was only at 1.3% a 1% decrease could almost be a recession. This also brings up the question of price gouging, when a seller spikes the price of a good or service. Advocates say it would create a steady supply that does not run out very quickly because the price isn't as affordable but critics say it would also hurt people who don't have much money that would have trouble affording to buy essential items if price gouging was legal. But I disagree that the government should "rebuild the agriculture economy" as that can just repair itself on its own it doesn't need government support. But I do agree that the government should provide immediate aid to individuals affected by these hurricanes.

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  38. What has the increased demand for gas caused? Likely it would cause the gas prices to skyrocket due to the lesser supply so they must sell it for more, just as you said happened with the decreased supply of grocery due to the threatened farmlands of Florida from Irma. However, for a while US has had a large surplus of food making it unusually cheap so the temporarily stunted production of grocery from Florida would not greatly affect food prices. Overtime, if the farmlands were destroyed, the production of grocery may begin to wane and thus we may need to increase production in other, thriving farmlands. The assistance provided to the ones affected by the hurricanes may also affect the wealth of our government and possibly increase its debt.

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  39. Your ability to connect the natural disasters to the economy, the farming lands, and unemployment spikes, were excellent. You were able to find connections throughout the areas affected. I also enjoyed the fact that you were able to use the app GasBuddy to show as evidence as to how certain supplies are dipping in availability, such as gas stations losing gas due to the increase of people needing it for necessities and to survive. I agree that due to all these natural disasters the state of all areas hit are damaged and will take major time to repair. Places and homes will have to rebuilt, offices and factories repaired, and so much more.

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  40. I agree with you that both Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma have impacted the U.S. economy negatively. It is important that we offer help to those in need and provide them with goods/services to help them get through this tough time. However, this is an opportunity cost for living in Texas and Florida. By living in these regions, you expose yourselves to risk of hurricane destruction. This is something to consider when choosing where to live.

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  41. I agree with about what the economic effects has been caused by these two hurricanes. Yous used really good examples to show how the Hurricanes are effecting way more people then just the residents of Florida and Texas. I thought when you told us information about the app GasBuddy that information was very interesting and is critical information for the people living in these areas.

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  42. This is a very well written piece and it shows that the hurricane didn't on;y affect Florida and Texas but the entire nation. I thought is was creative when you showed us the gas tracker. I think that is important to know because it affects the economy. I agree that the places that were hit are going to have a long recovery trying to repair all the damage that was done. One of the topics you mentioned was the unemployment rates have raised to 298,000. that is tremendously high and will impact everyone involved.

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  43. With all of the money that will need to be spent rebuilding the buildings and homes damaged by the storm, what kind or economic impact will the rebuilding stage have. JJ Watt has been raising awareness through social media about donations for these cities effected and was able to raise over 37 million dollars. With that amount of money going towards the cause, how big of a help will that be and how big of an impact do you think that will make.

    -Cam M

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  44. You were able to connect the tragic events of the hurricanes to the economy very well. I agree with what you stated about the economy that was caused by the hurricanes because the hurricanes did cause a great deal of damage. The hurricanes did cause a lot of damage to the USA, which affected the economy because of the resources that were destroyed and also used to help rebuild the affected areas.

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  45. The connections you made are seamlessly accurate; we are able to see the effects of the hurricanes in real time. We are seeing gas prices - in Pewaukee - rise and we can articulate that it is most definitely an effect from Harvey and Irma. Subsequently, you made great economic ties with how the land, citrus produce, and the agricultural industry as a whole are being affected. I do agree with you that these natural disasters will slow economic growth, however, it is good that gas prices are a bit higher because of the scarcity of that resource.

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  46. I agree that both Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma have affected not just the area the hurricanes hit, but the whole United States. The increase in prices affect people all over the country with the fruit prices and the gas prices. This put more stress on the families that needed the gas prices lower. The opportunity cost for the families across the country have raised because they now are spending more money on gas, and the extra money can not be spent on anything else.

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  47. I agree that these hurricanes have an impact in our economy but it doesn't just affect a specific location but the country as a whole. The examples that were used in the piece were really good example to show people some of the impacts on the economy. However, it won't always be bad and have an impact. It gives the country an opportunity to rebuild and fix the destruction. In this piece it mentions that the unemployment rate will decrease and I agree when the hurricanes hit the unemployment rate will decrease but it will also create jobs to help this country come together and rebuild.

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  48. Overall, the writing was excellent. The best part about your writing was connecting the natural disasters to the economic impact they had on the communities. You mentioned the gas pricing increasing due to the lack of gas. This brought up a strength because both positive and negative externalities were incorporated. In addition, you mentioned talking about unemployment rate as well. However, what could have been mentioned was how this may create jobs for the unemployment.

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  49. I agree with how economically negative the effects of the hurricane were. Some parts that helped me understand the effects were the visuals and also the statistics provided to prove the stated point. However, I think it would be really helpful to consider the few positive aspects that come out of the destruction for example the jobs that are created from the restoration efforts including construction work.

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  50. As you previously stated, the recent hurricanes are affecting the whole country, not just Florida and Texas. Looking at Lexi B's comment I can definitely see how the hurricanes could actually help with unemployment. You made many good references to how the hurricanes are even effecting us in Wisconsin and I think you did an overall good job with your writing and your use of pictures.

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  51. You make a great point in recognizing that these Hurricanes not only impact the people near them but the entire USA as well. I can relate to the comment about how gas prices, even here in Pewaukee, are rising as a direct impact of the hurricane devastation. Great point made.

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  52. I agree the government must step in. If they don't, the economic problems caused by this disaster will continue to affect the US for years. The gas shortage may last and gas prices may remain high if we and the government don't find a solution. The government must also step in to help the farmers so their farms can produce profitably in the future and the Floridian economy can remain as productive as it was before Irma. Also, the DUA will help the unemployed, but many of the unemployed have also lost their homes and will need affordable housing in order to become financially stable again, so the government is probably going to find a way to subsidize home building/restoration.

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